Weekly Game Review: “12 chairs”

Year: 2002
Genre: Quest, Adventure
Discs: 2 CD(*.iso)
Developer: Saturn+
Entertainer: Buka
Requirements: Windows 98/Me/2000/XP, Celeron 300, ram 32 mb, Cd-Rom 4-x, DirectX 8.0
Hints: The bottom line: “12 chairs” – another game, produced jointly by “Buck” and “Saturn +” continues a series of animated quests. The passage contains spoilers to some parts of the game, so if you arent familiar with the game or dont want to know what to expect, recommended. From the mid-90s onwards, PC games lost mass-market traction to console games before enjoying a resurgence in the mid-2000s through digital distribution.[1][2] The uncoordinated nature of the PC game market and its lack of physical media make precisely assessing its size difficult. The faster graphics accelerators and improving CPU technology resulted in increasing levels of realism in computer games. By 1988, the enormous popularity of the Nintendo Entertainment System had greatly affected the computer-game industry. Id Software went on to develop Wolfenstein 3D in 1992, which helped to popularize the genre, kick-starting a genre that would become one of the highest-selling in modern times.[25] The game was originally distributed through the shareware distribution model, allowing players to try a limited part of the game for free but requiring payment to play the rest, and represented one of the first uses of texture mapping graphics in a popular game, along with Ultima Underworld. (The game Les Manley 2 satirized this by depicting two beautiful women exhaust the hero in bed, by requesting that he again explain the difference between extended and expanded memory.) Computer Gaming World provided technical assistance to its writers to help install games for review.[32] By 1996, the growing popularity of Microsoft Windows simplified device driver and memory management. PC games, also known as computer games or personal computer games, are video games played on a personal computer rather than a dedicated video game console or arcade machine. By 1988, the enormous popularity of the Nintendo Entertainment System had greatly affected the computer-game industry. Home computer games became popular following the video game crash of 1983, particularly in Europe, leading to the era of the "bedroom coder". Home computer games became popular following the video game crash of 1983, particularly in Europe, leading to the era of the "bedroom coder". IBM, the world's largest computer company, introduced the IBM Personal Computer (PC) in 1981.

Walkthrough:

This is a detective game in which you have a helper named Smart Alex. Using Smart Alex you can explore and analyze the items that were in your inventory, interact with different objects, turn on/off the flashlight, move to another location, get hints, and, in addition, to skip the puzzle. The game has a scoring system that determines what rank you get at the end of the game. The more points you earn, the higher the rating. Points are awarded for various actions, for example, collecting comic books, solving puzzles, etc. NOTE: At the simplest level of complexity you lose points for skipping puzzles and the use of Smart tips Alex. Also, you lose points for dying, regardless of difficulty level. Vorobyaninov decides to look for the treasure alone, but by chance he meets on his way tipster Ostap Bender. Computer games, however, did not disappear. Home computer games became popular following the video game crash of 1983, particularly in Europe, leading to the era of the "bedroom coder". As 3D graphics libraries such as DirectX and OpenGL matured and knocked proprietary interfaces out of the market, these platforms gained greater acceptance in the market, particularly with their demonstrated benefits in games such as Unreal.[33] However, major changes to the Microsoft Windows operating system, by then the market leader, made many older DOS-based games unplayable on Windows NT, and later, Windows XP (without using an emulator, such as DOSbox). By 1989 Computer Gaming World reported that "the industry is moving toward heavy use of VGA graphics".[20] While some games were advertised with VGA support at the start of the year, they usually supported EGA graphics through VGA cards. From the mid-90s onwards, PC games lost mass-market traction to console games before enjoying a resurgence in the mid-2000s through digital distribution.[1][2] The uncoordinated nature of the PC game market and its lack of physical media make precisely assessing its size difficult. Consumers began purchasing DOS computers for the home in large numbers. Although personal computers only became popular with the development of the microprocessor and microcomputer, computer gaming on mainframes and minicomputers had previously already existed. First sold in 1977, Microchess eventually sold over 50,000 copies on cassette tape. By 1987 the PC market was growing so quickly that the formerly business-only computer had become the largest and most important platform for computer game companies. These extras gradually became less common, but many games were still sold in the traditional over-sized boxes that used to hold the extra "feelies".